Microsoft executives resign

Software giant Microsoft will lose two key regional executives in the coming months. Emre Berkin, chairman at Microsoft Middle East and Africa has resigned and will leave the company in January 2006. Abdullatif Al Mulla, general manager, strategic business development for Gulf and Pakistan, has also resigned and will leave the vendor at the end of November 2005.

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By  Stuart Wilson Published  November 7, 2005

Software giant Microsoft will lose two key regional executives in the coming months. Emre Berkin, chairman at Microsoft Middle East and Africa has resigned and will leave the company in January 2006. Abdullatif Al Mulla, general manager, strategic business development for Gulf and Pakistan, has also resigned and will leave the vendor at the end of November 2005. Bahaa Issa, corporate communications manager at Microsoft Gulf, confirmed: “Abdullatif Al Mulla has resigned from his position and will leave at the end of the month to pursue other opportunities outside Microsoft. Emre Berkin has also resigned and will leave the company in January. Emre joined Microsoft in 1993 and has been with the company for 12 years.” In addition to his role as Chairman at Microsoft Middle East and Africa, Berkin also served as VP for Microsoft EMEA. Berkin joined Microsoft in 1993 to establish the vendor’s operations in Turkey. According to his executive biography on Microsoft’s website, ‘Berkin is credited with accelerating the growth and expansion of Microsoft’s operations in Middle East and Africa’. Abdullatif joined Microsoft in 1996 and has served the organisation in various capacities. He also received the prestigious Microsoft President award for his contribution in helping build Microsoft’s operations in the region. In late August 2005, Microsoft announced that it would merge its North Gulf and South Gulf subsidiaries into a single operating unit, headquartered in Dubai. As part of the restructuring plan, Abdullatif moved from his position as general manager at Microsoft South Gulf to become general manager, strategic business development for Microsoft Gulf and Pakistan. Speaking at the time, Ali Faramawy, VP at Microsoft EMEA, said: “The best time to make a change is when things are going well, this allows you to look at the future, assess your alternatives and strategies without pressure or panic. These two subsidiaries had phenomenal results in the last few years, so this change is driven primarily by the potential opportunities that the synergies between the Gulf countries bring to us.” “Grouping these two regions allows Microsoft to create a much stronger Gulf operation, enabling us to make more specialised resources and expertise available to our customers and partners while also retaining the breadth of our presence in the region. Microsoft already has the largest local direct presence of any major IT multinational in the Middle East, and now we are looking to strengthen that presence even further,” he added. At the time of the restructuring, distributors and resellers claimed that the move would help Microsoft improve its regional routes-to-market and channel engagement model.

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