Samsung enters photo printer market

The world's second largest laser print engine manufacturer, Samsung, has expanded its product family with the launch of its first ever 6 x 4-inch photo printer.

  • E-Mail
By  Matthew Wade Published  October 31, 2005

The world's second largest laser print engine manufacturer, Samsung, has expanded its product family with the launch of its first ever 6 x 4-inch photo printer. Its new compact SPP-2040 and SPP-2020 models are the company's first PC-independent dye-sublimation photo printers. Targeted at users wanting to print high quality photos from a variety of digital mediums, these products will go head-to-head in the region with Epson’s PictureMate, HP’s Photosmart 375 and Canon’s Selphy models, as well as similar offerings from the likes of Dell and Kodak. “Samsung is launching a versatile photo printer range which offers consumers genuine flexibility in the way they produce their digital photographs,” said Mr. K. H. Koh, general manager of Samsung Gulf Electronics’ Digital Information Technology division. “Users have the option of PC-independent and wireless connectivity from a number of digital devices and the option to edit their photos. The end result is a high quality printed image delivered cost-effectively in a minute,” he added. Both lightweight 180x136x67mm models sport 300 x 300dpi print engines and a claimed colour photo print speed of just 60 seconds, which Samsung says is the quickest on the market. Both models connect to the user’s PC using a USB 2.0 cable, as well as both supporting Bluetooth and PictBridge. The higher end SPP-2040 also lets users edit their pictures directly on the printer, as it packs in a 7-in-1 memory card reader, formatting controls, and a two-inch LCD preview screen. On entering the consumer photo printing market, Samsung has opted to employ dye sublimation technology in its machines, rather than going the more generally popular inkjet route. This decision is down to what Samsung perceives as a key weakness of inkjet technology, namely its colour level problems. “Unlike inkjet printers, dye diffusion thermal transfer (dye sublimation) ensures that there is never a colour level issue, which occurs when one colour of cartridge on an inkjet goes low,” explained Lancy Menezes, sales and marketing manager of the firm’s Digital Printing Division. “The SPP-2020 and SPP-2040 have a built-in ability to balance colour levels, even when printing multiple copies, so they should always output rich colour prints with pleasing flesh tones.” The SPP-2020 comes with 1MB Flash and 16MB DRAM and a 40-sheet cassette tray, while the SPP-2040 integrates 4MB Flash and 32MB DRAM.

Add a Comment

Your display name This field is mandatory

Your e-mail address This field is mandatory (Your e-mail address won't be published)

Security code