Damas trials RFID in UAE jewellery stores

Damas is trialing radio frequency identification (RFID) technology in its stores in the UAE, prior to a global rollout. The jeweller is using RFID tags to cut inventory costs and make it easier to guard against theft.

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By  Diana Milne Published  October 23, 2005

Damas is trialing radio frequency identification (RFID) technology in its stores in the UAE, prior to a global rollout. The jeweller is using RFID tags to cut inventory costs and make it easier to guard against theft. Dubai-based company The Jewellery Store (TJS), which was set up this year by Damas and three other firms, has created the tags. Each tag contains a unique identification number which, when scanned by a reader, is transmitted to an inventory database which runs on a standard PC in the store. The database contains detailed information on each piece of jewellery and by passing the reader over any number of items a stock check is carried out in minutes. The RFID tags are being initially deployed in Damas stores in Dubai and Sharjah before the technology is rolled out to all the Damas stores worldwide. Dinesh Dhanak, group general manager at Damas LLC said the tags will revolutionise the way stock checks are carried out by the company. “This new technology means that we can count the jewellery twice a day if we want to and it does not have to be handled,” he said. Without the technology a full stock count requires a store to be closed for half a day, with consequent loss of business, plus the additional costs of paying back office staff to do the counting, he explained. The tags also take a lot of the guess work out of replenishing stock levels, Dhanak added. “Because it gives you quick access to a detailed inventory with information about which items are selling best you can see easily which stock needs to be replenished,” he said. Detecting and eradicating theft — by customers and staff — is also a major motivation behind Damas’s adoption of RFID technology. “Because jewellers only carry out a count around once a month it means that if they are say 100 grammes short — it is far harder to trace what has gone missing and how,” said Dhanak. “This will become much easier if a stock check can be carried out once a day,” he added. Furthermore the tags are tamper evident, as Gabriel Nasser, IT director at TJS explained. “The tampering with jewellery items is a big problem in Dubai but the RFID tags can help to overcome this,” he said. A wire is attached to each tag which acts as a connector to close the circuit, once the wire has been removed or the tag tampered with it no longer works. ”So, if somebody tries to remove a tag from a cheaper product then attach it to a more expensive product we will see it has been tampered with,” Nasser said. RFID is one of this year’s hot technologies, with vendors including Marks & Spencer and Wal-Mart deploying it globally. However, few companies in this region have gone public with plans to use it. Nasser said the company was seeing “overwhelming” interest in the jewellery tags, with enquiries from customers in other GCC countries and in Europe. Part of the tags unique appeal is that whereas other RFID products are sensitive to metal, TJS’ technology has overcome this problem, Nasser said.

2550 days ago
Jerald

Can you please let me know the vendor who provides solution for RFID?

Thanks

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