Abit simplifies tricky technology

Exhibiting at Gitex for the third year in a row, Taiwanese-based Abit Computer Corporation is showcasing its latest line of motherboards, which cater to both AMD and Intel-based processor platforms.

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By  Cleona Godinho Published  September 27, 2005

Exhibiting at Gitex for the third year in a row, Taiwanese-based Abit Computer Corporation is showcasing its latest line of motherboards, which cater to both AMD and Intel-based processor platforms. However, Abit is specifically focusing on its flagship model — the AW8-MAX motherboard, built around Intel's high-end 955X core-logic chipset. The AW8-MAX motherboard is the latest addition to Abit's new MAX Series and is the first motherboard to feature Silent OTES cooling technology. The company claims that this creates a top-end motherboard that not only performs well when dealing with applications and games but is still ultra-silent when in use. As Silent OTES is a fanless cooling solution, the company also expects a lower failure rate, as the dependency on fans (which can fail and cause components to overheat) to keep things cool is no longer present. The new board supports all of Intel's current processors including LGA775 Pentium 4 and Pentium D dual core processors. Hyper-Threading is fully supported along with Intel's 64-bit instruction set known as EMT64, dual-channel DDR2 memory — for increased memory bandwidth and even high-definition audio. Abit is also showing off its new uGuru drive bay, which caters to enthusiasts and overclockers specifically. The drive bay, which takes up residence in a PC's 5.25”drive bay allows for on-the-fly overclocking via a number of buttons and a backlit LCD screen. Simply put, this allows users to tweak and overclock their machine without ever getting into the motherboard's BIOS. If users get a little too carried the way, the firm has also cleverly placed a 'reset CMOS' button, which allows users to clear the BIOS without reaching into their casing. The drive bay also features front mounted USB, firewire and sound ports, which means users no longer need to duck around the back of their PC's casings to connect peripherals dependent on these connectors. The bay in-conjunction with software can also tell users when e-mail or even MSN messages are received.

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