OZ Optics tailors new optic fibre tools to market needs

OZ Optics is showcasing a select range of fibre delivery systems for telecom and scientific applications at Gitex this week. This is the second time that the company is participating at the event, and according to Omur Sezerman, president and chief executive of the company, last year gave them a better insight of what specific solutions customers in the region needs.

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By  Caroline Denslow Published  September 27, 2005

OZ Optics is showcasing a select range of fibre delivery systems for telecom and scientific applications at Gitex this week. This is the second time that the company is participating at the event, and according to Omur Sezerman, president and chief executive of the company, last year gave them a better insight of what specific solutions customers in the region needs. “Last year we were new to the event and brought a range of products with us. It was still beneficial; however, this year we are more focused in what we believe the market requires and have tailored our products to the demand,” Sezerman says. OZ Optics designs, manufactures and markets fibre optic components for existing and next-generation optical networks and systems. Its products enable customers to develop optical networking systems that transmit data reliably at increasing data rates. The company also designs and manufactures handheld test and measurement equipment for the fibre optic market. “Our broad product line addresses technical challenges related to polarisation, power equalization, laser-to-fibre delivery, and test and measurement in newer high-speed, optical networking systems. As a result, our products enable our customers to develop optical networking systems that transmit data reliably at increasing data rates,” Sezerman explains. At Gitex, OZ Optics is highlighting its fibre optic fault finder, a simplified version of an optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR). These fault finders can continuously monitor an active fibre optic link without interfering with the communications signal. It does this by transmitting a different wavelength than that used by the network. “By transmitting an optical pulse into a fibre and monitoring the returned signals the fault finder can identify the positions of reflections and losses. Unlike an OTDR, which displays the entire waveform, the Fault Finder simply reports attenuating or reflective events, with a corresponding distant from the Fault Finder for each event. This minimises the amount of information that needs to be transmitted from the unit to a host computer,” Sezerman continues. Fault finders can transmit data via a USB link, a wireless link or by custom configurations. The wireless link allows the fault finder to be installed in a remote location that might otherwise be difficult to access. The wireless link allows the fault finder to automatically report problems back to a central office. This can speed up the work of a field technician as the location of problems can be immediately received via laptop or smart cell phone, without having to physically connect to the device. “Our aim at this year’s event is to get wireless and oil companies to subscribe to our products and so far things are looking promising,” Sezerman concludes.

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