PCs Wyse up to thin client

Wyse offers thin-client technology and, with 38% of the world market in 2003, the company is continually surpassing the IDC industry growth rate.

  • E-Mail
By  Sarah Gain Published  September 27, 2005

Most employees spend more than eight hours a day sitting in front of the most important piece of IT infrastructure in their working lives — the desktop. How employees access corporate data and applications is one of the most critical parts of a company’s IT strategy, yet many organisations never give a second thought to the desktop. “Businesses appear to be wedded to the PC out of habit,” says Simon Richards, channel sales director for Wyse Technology, which develops hardware and software technologies that shift complexity from the edge to the centre of the network. Wyse offers thin-client technology and, with 38% of the world market in 2003, the company is continually surpassing the IDC industry growth rate. “Gitex is the perfect chance for us to meet customers, partners and distributors in the region. It helps us to further reinforce our position in the market,” Richards says. Thin client computing, put simply, involves hosting all applications and data centrally on a server and accessing it using the straightforward graphics-based terminal known as a thin client. This approach differs from a client server architecture where some of the data and applications reside on PCs spread throughout the organisation. “Thin clients are in fact the successor to the mainframe terminal. The difference is the user interface is as good as a PC. Hence, they give all the benefits of a terminal but without the disadvantages of a PC,” explains Richards. Indeed, thin clients have a number of benefits when compared with PCs. Not only is the purchase price lower but also, as Wyse Rapport device management software is included in the purchase price of every terminal, businesses need no additional software to get started. “Far fewer support calls are generated and all support can be centralised. This makes management significantly easier,” he explains. “Also, one installation of software is done on a server and this can upgrade literally thousands of desktops, which saves both time and money. A thin client architecture can significantly reduce total cost of ownership (TCO),” Richards adds.

Add a Comment

Your display name This field is mandatory

Your e-mail address This field is mandatory (Your e-mail address won't be published)

Security code