BSA to eye Shopper for pirates

This years Gitex Shopper will be policed by the Business Software Alliance (BSA), which will have its own stand to spread the word on the detrimental effect of piracy in the Middle East and keep its eye on the traders at the show.

  • E-Mail
By  Andy Tillett Published  September 20, 2005

This years Gitex Shopper will be policed by the Business Software Alliance (BSA), which will have its own stand to spread the word on the detrimental effect of piracy in the Middle East, and keep its eye on the traders at the show. The BSA will ensure strict monitoring at Shopper to prevent any illegal software trade, thereby rendering the exhibition piracy free for the fourth consecutive year. It will be educating show attendees through distribution of brochures, booklets and printouts related to the issues concerning software piracy and adhering to intellectual property rights (IPR) and copyright laws. “The host of measures taken by BSA and its allies to reduce piracy levels in the Middle East will help enhance the region's status. The participation of leading international IT companies in Gitex reflects the pioneering status the UAE has achieved in the industry through adoption of strict measures to protect IPR,” said Jawad Al Redha, co chairman, at BSA Middle East. The UAE is the only country in the Middle East region to make it into the top twenty list of countries with the lowest piracy rates in the BSA’s second annual Anti Piracy Study, published in May 2005. The BSA is a member of the Arabian Anti Piracy Alliance (AAA), which currently has operations in the UAE, Saudi Arabia and Kuwait. Scott Butler, CEO of the AAA, said in a recent interview with Channel Middle East: “In most of the cases in the UAE offenders are sent to jail. In Kuwait the police are not involved in copyright enforcement and we are yet to see an imprisonment from them. In Saudi Arabia we have a huge problem with litigation and, again, we are yet to see anyone put in prison for a single day.” “We greatly appreciate the efforts of the UAE government for its continued commitment in fighting piracy by supporting BSA’s initiatives and more importantly by introducing suitable legislations and policies. Tackling a serious issue like piracy cannot be successful without the backing of the government, especially considering the magnitude of the problem,” concluded Al Redha. The BSA has made a number of raids in the UAE this year, leading to arrests of three people charged with software piracy between July and September. Sentences typically range from six months to a year.

Add a Comment

Your display name This field is mandatory

Your e-mail address This field is mandatory (Your e-mail address won't be published)

Security code