Video-conferencing craze

The events of 9/11 changed the world in many ways, including dissuading people from catching planes. As a result, companies have started to take advantage of a safe and less tiring alternative: video-conferencing, one of the fastest growing industries in the world.

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By  Angela Prasad Published  July 24, 2005

The events of 9/11 changed the world in many ways, including dissuading people from catching planes. As a result, companies have started to take advantage of a safe and less tiring alternative: video-conferencing, one of the fastest growing industries in the world. According to an international survey, the average revenue on worldwide video-conferencing will increase from US$500 million in 2005 to US$8 billion by 2008 in the Middle East, Asia, Europe and America. Roger Paine, managing director of Video Connections International, is ensuring the Middle East, and in particular the UAE, is a part of that growth with a boom in the local video-conferencing sector. “Dubai is experiencing augmentation in every sense of the word and attitudes to business change along with that. Time is money and every paid hour that an employee spends delayed by traffic jams or international travel comes straight off the bottom line of the business, with cancelled or delayed face-to-face meetings becoming the worst offender,” he says. Video-conferencing removes the stress and wasted time of travelling to meetings both locally and globally. With many of the worlds leading international brands setting up in Dubai, and with the opening of the Dubai International Financial Centre scheduled for September, video-conferencing will likely become an essential and common part of business practice.

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