Infranet initiative gets new name, gains support

Not only does Juniper Networks’ Infranet initiative have a new name, it has also gained the support of networking bigwigs Cisco Systems and Alcatel. The initiative, which has recently been renamed as IPSphere, is looking at developing a framework for improving internet infrastructure convergence.

  • E-Mail
By  Caroline Denslow Published  July 19, 2005

Not only does Juniper Networks’ Infranet initiative have a new name, it has also gained the support of networking bigwigs Cisco Systems and Alcatel. The initiative, which has recently been renamed as IPSphere, is looking at developing a framework for improving internet infrastructure convergence. The IPsphere Forum is a member-funded, open community focused on the ‘business of IP’ and coordinating efforts to develop the architecture for an IP (internet protocol) infrastructure able to support the broadest possible set of service provider and network user business or service models. “As a member-funded, open forum, the IPsphere Forum’s objective is to encourage and catalyse the effort related to the deployment of an IP infrastructure that can meet the profitability and capability needs of network, content and applications service providers and service user communities,” said Kevin Dillon, chair, IPsphere Forum. The group plans to develop programmes and processes that will allow carrier services to interoperate with each other, while conforming to business, revenue settlement and service level agreement guidelines. Already, the body has started defining standardised interfaces for client networks and between carrier MPLS (multi-protocol line service) networks to ensure that service availability spans across multiple carriers. For example, a company will one day be able to use the public internet for critical applications that, at present, require private networks and high levels of security and performance features. “The forum intends to promote the standardisation of service-oriented architecture (SOA) approaches to network service federation, publication and consumption by identifying requirements and current gaps, specifying mechanisms to address these, and contributing to the work conducted by associated standard bodies,” Dillon added. The ability to offer security and quality of service is of particular interest for service providers because it would generate new revenue streams for them, especially when IP connectivity offerings are becoming increasingly commoditised. But the ultimate goal for the forum is to guarantee that the same performance and security levels are carried out across multiple carriers’ networks, not just to a single private network. A third-party standards body would govern IPSphere, Dillon said, because they realised it would attract an even broader effort if the organisation was independent. The International Telecommunication Union, Alliance for Telecommunications Industry Solutions and the European Telecommunications Standards Institute are being considered to take on the position.

Add a Comment

Your display name This field is mandatory

Your e-mail address This field is mandatory (Your e-mail address won't be published)

Security code