Lenovo's Big Blue plans

Lenovo, fresh from taking over IBM's personal computer division, has announced plans to open a development centre on Big Blue’s land in North Carolina., with founding partners Intel, IBM, LANDesk, Microsoft, and Symantec.

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By  Jane Plunkett Published  June 2, 2005

Lenovo, fresh from taking over IBM's personal computer division, has announced plans to open a development centre on Big Blue’s land in North Carolina., with founding partners Intel, IBM, LANDesk, Microsoft, and Symantec. Lenovo, together with its partners will use the development centre as a testing ground for customers, business partners, solution providers and independent software vendors to collaborate on new personal computing solutions to address the challenges of today’s IT market. The company is developing portions of IBM's existing 25,000-square-foot Innovation Centre facility in Research Triangle Park to facilitate the new development centre. On completion users of the center will be able to spend a couple of days to designing, building and testing new desktop and laptop products to suit their individual needs and the needs of customers. "Lenovo and its partners will use this center to make innovation relevant to our customers," said Deepak Advani, senior vice president, Lenovo. "Together, our companies offer a vast portfolio of expertise, hardware and software solutions, education, and services. The center will focus those resources on resolving specific customer problems," he added. The centre will be staffed with engineers, programmers, product developers, and sales and marketing professionals from these companies. Its aim is to create an incubation environment for the design, creation, validation, proof of concept, and deployment of new personal computing solutions. The facility also will house an imaging and training-services area as well as a showcase for previous designs. Chip maker Intel said that its interest in the centre lies in platforms, and research and development areas such as virtualisation and active management technology. Partners such as security vendors Symantec and LANDesk are aiming to incorporate their technologies in various systems, while Microsoft said it is interested in creating and maintaining secure infrastructures and will use the centre to give customers hands-on training with new technologies. Andrew Flanagan, programme director at Lenovo's Innovation Centre said Lenovo is also trying to attract health care, pharmaceutical and banking industries as prospective centre users. A bank, he explains, might want to use a fingerprint reader to secure its PCs well enough so that they could run on a wireless network. Construction is expected to be completed early in the third quarter of this year and initial customer projects are already being accepted, Lenovo said. It did not reveal how much it is investing in the center. Lenovo completed its US$1.75 billion buy of IBM's PC business earlier this month, promising a wave of new products to be sold outside of China. These are expected to include new ThinkPad notebooks, with features such as rotating screens that would allow them to be used as tablet computers.

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