Macrovision tackles DVD pirates

Content protection company Macrovision has developed a technology that it reckons will stop DVD pirates in their tracks.

  • E-Mail
By  Matthew Wade Published  May 9, 2005

Content protection company Macrovision has developed a technology that it reckons will stop DVD pirates in their tracks. The firm’s new ‘RipGuard DVD’ technology will first be licensed to the company's partners – namely studios that are part of the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) – Macrovision executives were quoted as telling the ExtremeDRM web site. According to Adam Gervin, who is Macrovision’s senior marketing director for its entertainment technologies group, in the past DVD discs used the Content Scramble System (CSS) to prevent piracy. However a program called ‘DeCSS' was soon developed and distributed online and has since found its way into 70 different software packages that are downloadable online in either freeware and shareware form. "CSS encryption standards are binary," Gervin commented. "They're great until you break it, and then it's worthless. DeCSS made its way into the public's understanding, that perfect digital copies can be made in minutes. The cat's out of the bag." RipGuard has been designed to eliminate an even easier source of piracy; namely the digital bitstream itself. Although Macrovision has yet to give full details of its RipGuard technology, it was described by Gervin as "a format-based technology applied to optical media of the DVD." The good news for end users is that RipGuard enabled DVD discs will not require consumers to buy new DVD players. Gervin claims that over a billion dollars has already been lost to users who "rip and return" – in other words consumers who rent a movie, copy it to their own digital library, and then return it the next day.

Add a Comment

Your display name This field is mandatory

Your e-mail address This field is mandatory (Your e-mail address won't be published)

Security code