Novell plans major OES upgrade, extends ZENworks suite

The Open Enterprise Server (OES), Novell’s merged Linux/Netware operating system, is getting a major update, which is scheduled for release in the first half of 2007.

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By  Caroline Denslow Published  April 28, 2005

The Open Enterprise Server (OES), Novell’s merged Linux/Netware operating system, is getting a major update, which is scheduled for release in the first half of 2007. Codenamed Cypress, the new version of OES will see the transition of Novell’s current product line to one that is based on Linux. It will combine a future version of NetWare with version 10 of Novell’s Suse Linux Enterprise Server, which will be released early next year. Cypress will offer better Linux monitoring and management tools, improved integration between the Linux desktop and Cypress identity and management services, and Linux support for the Novell Storage Services file system, according to the company’s roadmap. Novell is targeting Windows users with Cypress, which will also include migration tools to help users move from Windows web e-mail servers and management software to allow administrators to manage the Samba file-and-print software from Novell’s iManager console. The company is banking on Cypress to improve Novell’s market share as existing products, such as its operating system NetWare — once a dominant force in the market — continue to record poor results. According to IDC, NetWare holds only less than 6% of worldwide server installations. It expects this figure to continue to decline to as low as 3% by 2007. Novell also announced that it has completed its acquisition of Tally Systems, and has expanded its ZENworks systems management offering, with plans to ship ZENworks Asset Management next week. ZENworks Asset Management, a set of integrated tools with discovery and inventory, license management and software usage and trend analysis capabilities, will use technology inherited from Tally, an IT asset management specialist. It will include tools to automatically discover, identify and report hardware and software assets in the enterprise, and a software compliance component that will provide a comparison of inventory with purchase and license records. These features will particularly prove useful for companies because it will enable them to keep track of systems information and assets across their organisations, therefore allowing them to control software spending and to ensure that they comply with software license agreements and government regulations, such as the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. “Products that offer inventory, usage and software distribution enable customers to monitor usage trends that can track the use of unauthorised applications and more accurately use software distribution to set and enforce corporate standards,” said Gartner research director Patricia Adams.

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