Oracle will acquire more software firms

Oracle’s spending spree hasn’t finished yet, with the company looking to make more billion dollar-plus deals, its chairman said this month. The software giant has already identified its targets and will go into the market - if the price is right.

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By  Peter Branton Published  April 24, 2005

Oracle’s spending spree hasn’t finished yet, with the company looking to make more billion dollar-plus deals, its chairman said this month. The software giant has already identified its targets and will go into the market - if the price is right. Last year Oracle bought rival vendor PeopleSoft for US$10.3 billion and followed this up with the purchase of retail software maker Retek this year for US$650 million. Speaking exclusively to IT Weekly Jeff Henley, Oracle’s chairman, said the vendor was now looking at other deals. “It is likely that we will consider doing several multi-million dollar acquisitions in the near future,” he said. “We have interests in technology and applications. I can’t say for sure the exact timing… but we have identified large acquisitions [in excess of US$1 billion] but whether we do them depends on the price and the timing.” Oracle recently bought software maker Oblix for an undisclosed amount. However, Henley added that this did not mean Oracle would not develop its own technology. “Acquisitions are more important than in the past but we continue to develop a lot of software,” he said. “We will continue with that but given the consolidation of the industry we will start to do more acquisitions than we did historically,” he added. Middle East customers will see the benefit of Oracle being a bigger company, Henley claimed: “The acquisition will give us more presence, more R&D dollars and more intellectual capital,” he said. “Our number one position in the Middle East will be more attractive going forward.” One company that Oracle is highly unlikely to buy is arch-rival SAP, which has firmly denied recent reports of talks. The company said that remarks by CEO Henning Kagermann had been taken out of context.

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