Radio rumpus

Motorola has thrown its lot in with the second largest faction, the World Wide Spectrum Efficiency (WWiSE) consortium, as IEEE bids to finalise the new Wi-Fi radio standard 802.11n.

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By  Simon Duddy Published  March 1, 2005

Motorola has thrown its lot in with the second largest faction, the World Wide Spectrum Efficiency (WWiSE) consortium, as IEEE bids to finalise the new Wi-Fi radio standard 802.11n. The vendor was eliminated from a round of voting in January. The other faction is TGn Sync, which includes Atheros, Agere, and Intel. At the last meeting of the IEEE 802.11 working group in January, this group got a majority of the vote. Neither group wants to see a repeat of what happened in the 802.15.3a / Ultrawideband (UWB) standard, which ultimately led to two groups coming up with UWB technologies that don't necessarily interoperate. The two 802.11n proposals have significant differences. Although both use multiple-in, multiple-out (MIMO) architecture, TGn Sync wants the mandatory channel width to be 40MHz, with only two antennas needed at minimum, whereas WWiSE wants 20MHz mandatory, with four antennas (with 40MHz channels as an option). WWiSE believes this will make the 11n standard more backwards-compatible and regulation-friendly worldwide, as 40MHz channels are not permitted in Japan and in areas of Europe.

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