Cisco delves into IPS

Cisco has launched a range of security products under the umbrella of the Adaptive Threat Defense (ATD) phase of its Self-Defending Network security strategy.

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By  Simon Duddy Published  February 20, 2005

Cisco has launched a range of security products under the umbrella of the Adaptive Threat Defense (ATD) phase of its Self-Defending Network security strategy. This next phase is designed to maximise network robustness by introducing proactive security elements. The products will increase Cisco’s competitiveness against a number of vendors from ISS to McAfee, Symantec and 3Com after its TippingPoint acquisition. The initiative encompasses a wide range of products, some of which are free as part of Cisco service contracts, while others are standalone devices retailing for as much as US$80,000. Cisco has divided the phase into three categories — Anti-X defences, application security and network control and containment. The Anti-X defences predominately focus on intrusion prevention systems (IPS) with new versions of Cisco IPS and also Cisco Security Agent. The vendor has also introduced the Cisco Anomaly Guard module for Catalyst 6500 switches, which it claims will protect against zero day denial of service attacks. Among the application security devices released is the VPN 3000 Concentrator, which the vendor claims provides broadened access to virtually any application with advanced endpoint and malware protection. The network control and containment aspect encompasses network intelligence and the virtualisation of security technologies to provide the ability to layer auditing and correlation capabilities. “Because the network is a strategic customer asset, the protection of its business-critical applications and resources is a top priority,” says Ghazi Atallah, general manager, Cisco Middle East. “Today’s announcement is part of Cisco’s ongoing commitment to deliver a more secure portfolio designed around the evolving demands of global businesses – from their design and architectural needs at inception to helping protect their long-term network investments,” he adds. The initial phases of the Self-Defending Network strategy focused on blending Internet Protocol (IP) and security technologies and introducing the Network Admission Control (NAC) initiative.

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