An anti-virus solution in every home

Software firm McAfee’s resellers are talking to the Egyptian and Jordanian authorities about how they can improve the virus protection offered to end users of government home PC schemes.

  • E-Mail
By  Matthew Wade Published  January 9, 2005

Software firm McAfee’s resellers are talking to the Egyptian and Jordanian authorities about how they can improve the virus protection offered to end users of government home PC schemes. As part of McAfee’s strategy to corner the region’s consumer market, the company’s partners are looking to get involved with the two governments’ respective PC home initiatives. These schemes aim to help students and underprivileged families afford their own computers and subsequently improve IT literacy. “Egypt is affected more by viruses than any other market, and people are not educated as to the damage that viruses can wreak,” explained Abdulrahman Gorashi, McAfee’s Middle East and Pakistan general manager for the SMB and consumer segments. “Through taking part in national PC initiatives we hope to educate customers about the importance of anti-virus products and also improve our brand image.” What this might mean in practice is that Egyptian and Jordanian users who sign up to buy PCs might receive either a desktop computer pre-loaded with McAfee’s VirusScan program or a separate boxed version of the software. According to Gorashi, 2005 will see McAfee putting more emphasis on its consumer business as it attempts to turn shop shelves red and yellow with its retail products. “Most end-users here see us as an enterprise company,” Gorashi commented. “While we have enjoyed success in the corporate sector, our focus is now shifting towards home consumers and small to medium businesses.” In Egypt the Ministries of Education and Telecommunications' two PC schemes, ‘A Computer for Every Student’ and ‘A Computer for Every Home’ have, it claims, proved very successful to date. These programmes offer systems priced ten percent lower than market standards with the aim of boosting the number of PC users in the country by three million over a five-year period. Jordan kicked off a similar scheme last year and Saudi Arabia’s authorities look set to announce contracts for a similar initiative in March or April.

Add a Comment

Your display name This field is mandatory

Your e-mail address This field is mandatory (Your e-mail address won't be published)

Security code