Everex gets home designs

Bill Gates supposedly wants a PC on every desktop: Everex Systems is looking to get one in every room.

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By  Peter Branton Published  October 6, 2004

Bill Gates supposedly wants a PC on every desktop: Everex Systems is looking to get one in every room. The vendor is launching a range of products it wants to fit into users’ digital lifestyles. “We want to get away from the traditional approach of selling PCs by focusing on what gigabytes it has or whatever,” says John Villejo, vice president, advanced systems group for Everex's parent company First International Computers. “We want to focus more on what the product can really do for users. This year, we've been bringing in these living-room, consumer-style products. We're focusing on a device for each room.” The first of these, the Everex CEPC, which Villejo says is suitable for the bedroom or a side room, has been launched in the Middle East and has already received a great reception, winning the coveted Windows Middle East award for best home PC at this year's Windows Awards ceremony held the day before Gitex itself. Everex will follow this up with the launch of the EPC, also known as the Spectra. “This is a product for your living room,” says Villejo. In order for the PC to sit within the living room it has to be extremely quiet of course: a noisy fan rattling away is hardly going to create an ambient atmosphere. The Spectra generates no more than 25Db when playing DVDs, Villejo claims, less than the noise of the average air conditioning system in a house. The Spectra can also record, display and wirelessly stream files with wireless LAN 802.11g. The keyboard and mouse are wireless and it features a media remote for watching TV, or playing music. Everex's ambitions for your house don't end there, with the company also launching a device designed to fit in with the lifestyle of younger members of the family, and in their bedrooms and studies. The Piston PC features a distinctive barrel design, which makes it easier to upgrade and connect to additional devices, according to Villejo. “The traditional cube PC design has limited expandability,” he argues. “We wanted to make a product which was easily accessible and easy to use.” By unscrewing two screws at the top of the Piston's cylinder, users can separate the device into two compartments, the front one of which is used for DVD drives and card readers, while the rear is used for a wide range of connections and add-on cards. “We see this product as being ideally suited for LAN parties and such, but we don't just see it as a fun product, we think it will work well as a vertical solution, such as a point of sale device for a bottling company,” says Villejo.

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