Sun pushes to talk

Sun Microsystems Middle East & North Africa (MENA) has announced that XPress, the digital radio trunking service provider in Jordan has invested US$1 million in Sun technology for its processing and storage requirements.

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By  Maddy Reddy Published  September 1, 2004

Sun Microsystems Middle East & North Africa (MENA) has announced that XPress – an integrated wireless communications operator, which is the first and only licensed digital radio trunking service provider in Jordan – has invested almost US$1 million in Sun technology for its processing and storage requirements. Xpress, the first telecom provider in the Middle East to offer ‘push-to-talk’ concept – also known as cell-phone walkie-talkies – was officially launched in Jordan in June this year. As part of the deal, XPress invested in a million dollars worth of hardware from Sun. Included in the package was a Sun Data Centre Server Platform, a Sun Fire 6800 – multi-domain high availability server, and a SE9970 (SAN), which is the first Hitachi Data Systems machine of its kind to be sold in the Levant region. Sun also sold two V880s to run the Xpress Oracle human resources software. The project was implemented by Sun partner Specialised Technical Services (STS). “Jordanians have caught on quickly to the benefits of chatting by simply pushing a button rather than dialing a number. The speed at which Jordanians have adopted this new service demonstrates how much of an impact this new form of communication is going to have on the Middle East market,” says Amer Mowafi, chief information officer, Xpress. In preparation for the rush of subscribers, XPress prioritised a sturdy hardware system based on the need for fast processing speeds, and capacity to store vast amounts of vital customer and business information. Push-to-Talk is a real-time direct one-to-one and one-to-many voice communication service in the cellular network. The always-on connection, calls can be started to both individuals and talk groups with just a push of a key. The call connection is almost instantaneous and the receiver does not have to answer the call. “XPress is a perfect example of how telecom companies can run their businesses efficiently and effectively by investing in a solid technology infrastructure,” says Mehmet Iyimen, managing director, MENA, Sun Microsystems. “Based on the overwhelming response from the Jordanian subscriber base and the anticipated business growth, we expect that the company’s infrastructure needs could easily double within the first year.” The service from XPress is based on Motorola's iDEN technology (Integrated Digital Enhanced Network), XPress will offer radio trunking dispatch services- combining the Direct Connect service with the services of ordinary mobile phones (telephone connectivity, SMS, and Packet Data). Direct Connect enables subscribers to communicate through one-to-one or one-to-many calls with a push of a single button, similar to the currently used "Walkie-Talkie" systems.

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