Xantic ships e-mail system to KOTC

Kuwait Oil Tankers Company (KOTC) is currently revamping its data communications system in a bid to cut costs and drive efficiency.

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By  Richard Agnew Published  August 26, 2004

Kuwait Oil Tankers Company (KOTC) is currently revamping its data communications system in a bid to cut costs and drive efficiency. The company, which transports much of the output of oil giant, Kuwait Petroleum Company (KPC), and manages one of the world's largest fleets, is integrating Xantic's AmosConnect e-mail solution. This, it says, will automatically compress the large reports it transmits regularly from ships to its head office and allow them to send and receive messages at the same time. Fourteen of the firm's 22 vessels have now been fitted with the system, replacing a more costly one the company created in-house. Xantic says that the solution offers an average 50% reduction in the size of all files, and 85% in the case of text and database documents. "We are doing this to reduce our communications costs, which can go very high," says Mohammed Al Qudahibi of KOTC. "We developed our own programme in 2000, but were looking for a better solution. We send a lot of large attachments, and previously the ship's officer had to do the compression himself [before] sending the message. With the new system, you just send the e-mail and it automatically finds the attachments and compresses them," he adds. KOTC plans to use AmosConnect to manage its ship to shore communications, which include monthly crew reports and updates on repairs and engine performance from the ship's chief engineer. Following tests on two of its vessels earlier this year, the company also says that the system proved more reliable than its homemade solution, which rather than sending messages via Xantic's earth station in Burum in the Netherlands, directly connected to the company's head office. "Dialing to Burum is the main advantage of the software," says Al Qudahibi. "It's more reliable. We are located in the heart of Kuwait City, and with all the cables in the city, sometimes we get a lot of noise. But the station in Burum is in an isolated place and, [despite] Inmarsat not being as solid as land communications, we’ve found that we do get a stable connection. Also, the system has dual communications, so we can send and receive e-mails at the same time," he adds.

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