Dell expands desktop range with PCI-Express models

Dell has announced it is starting to ship new OptiPlex corporate desktop PCs into the region.

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By  Matthew Wade Published  July 19, 2004

Dell has announced it is starting to ship its new PCI-Express (PCIe) configured OptiPlex SX280 and GX280 desktop PCs into the Middle East. These should be available within the next couple of weeks. The new PCs are based on Intel’s recently launched 915G Express chipsets and are powered by the latest Pentium 4 processors. Dell claims that its new machines’ PCIe configuration, along with their use of DDR2 memory, will allow corporate users to enjoy improved system, graphics and network performance. "Many of our customers face high costs of supporting desktops that are past their prime," said Michael Collins, general manager, Dell Middle East. "Businesses can extend their competitive edge with new technology and balance ever-present budget concerns. Excessive support costs are inevitable with aging desktops because of increased component failure, software support issues and heightened security exposures. The new OptiPlex computers offer the latest technology in a platform that is stable and serviceable to address the performance, management and reliability needs of businesses." Priced from $848, the SX280 features an industrial design and is aimed at corporate customers in space-constrained workspaces such as hospitals, schools and retail settings as it can be mounted horizontally or vertically underneath a desk, to a wall or behind the optional SX280 flat panel LCD monitor. The system's hot-swappable media bay accommodates any module from Dell’s Latitude D family of notebooks, allowing users to share modules. It also includes a sequential locking system that prevents unauthorised access to components and media modules. The OptiPlex GX280 meanwhile also costs from $848 and is available in small-form-factor, small desktop, or mini-tower chassis configurations. All three chassis types allow the option of a PCI-Express graphics solution in the form of a 64MB ATI Radeon X300 SE graphics card. The system also offers various optical drive options, as well as eight USB 2.0 ports. IBM also recently announced a new desktop PC based upon a smaller footprint than many notebooks. The firm’s upcoming ThinkCentre S50 is 28cm wide by 26cm deep and just 8.5cm high, about the size of a telephone directory or a packet of breakfast cereal, IBM helpfully pointed out at the time. Intel announced its two new chipset platforms, 915 G/P and 925X Express, in this region last month. Formerly codenamed Grantsdale and Alderwood, these were designed to allow PCs to act as wireless access points, although this feature will not be built into boards until later this year. The Intel 915 G/P and 925X Express Chipsets are also the first of Intel’s PC chipsets to feature new higher-speed DDR2 memory, which provides headroom for the continued growth of PC platform uses.

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