Systimax stresses cables for video

Systimax has carried out lab tests to emphasise the importance of high quality cabling in the smooth running of streaming video.

  • E-Mail
By  Simon Duddy Published  July 12, 2004

Systimax has carried out lab tests to emphasise the importance of high quality cabling in the smooth running of streaming video. The tests were carried out at Systimax Labs at Avaya. One test compared Systimax’s GigaSpeed XL solution, which exceeds Cat6 / Class E standards and a commercially available Cat5e solution using 100BASE-TX LAN streaming video. The cabling vendor claims that error tracking software showed a high rate of bit errors with the Category 5e cabling. These errors resulted in a choppy video image. In contrast, with the GigaSpeed there were no bit errors and video images were smooth and clear. In an additional demonstration, engineers conducted tests with Serial Digital Video (SDV). Using a DVD player with a 270 Mb/s output, engineers made comparisons between commercially available multi-vendor Category 5e and Category 6 compliant channels and the GigaSpeed XL Solution, with each used to create 100 metre channels that were stressed by the presence of high frequency noise to simulate real world stress on the network. The demands exceeded the capabilities of the Category 5e cabling and the video image was engulfed in snow, claims Systimax. The mixed vendor Category 6 cabling met the standard's minimum specifications, but its channel performance was inadequate. The tracking software detected many bit errors that appeared as snow in the video images. The higher performance channel used its extra 6dB near end crosstalk margin to deliver clear images. Systimax claims that its engineers then added two more connections to the high performance channel, taking the total to six, with no reduction in video quality. “High quality cabling delivers very substantial application benefits that businesses can translate into higher productivity,” says Martin Hennessey, sales director Systimax Solutions Middle East, North Africa, Turkey and Greece. “Video conferencing can make huge travel cost savings, but it hasn’t happened primarily because most LAN cabling cannot support reliable transmission of clear, continuous video images. If your management demands evidence to support promises of fast payback from new, high quality cabling, the scientific facts are now there to satisfy them,” he states.

Add a Comment

Your display name This field is mandatory

Your e-mail address This field is mandatory (Your e-mail address won't be published)

Security code