Intel recalls faulty chipsets

While Intel last week launched its new 915 and 925 Express chipsets with great fanfare, rather more quietly it has recalled several thousand of them because of a manufacturing error.

  • E-Mail
By  Peter Branton Published  June 29, 2004

While Intel last week launched its new 915 and 925 Express chipsets with great fanfare, rather more quietly it has recalled several thousand of them because of a manufacturing error. While Middle East customers are being told to return any affected products, Intel claims the regional impact will be minimal. Most regional end user should not be affected by the manufacturing error, Intel GCC general manager Semir Al-Schamma said, as most of the offending products have already been caught. “We believe that there are almost no affected units with customers in our region,” he said. The error, or “excursion” in Intel parlance, is caused by incomplete removal of thin film on the die pad area, and makes some I/O controllers in the chipsets susceptible to leaks in circuitry. This can lead to “a failure to boot, a system hang, or other anomalous system behaviour” according to Intel Middle East. The 915 and 925 chipsets were described by Intel executives as one of the most significant platform changes in more than a decade when they were launched on 21 June. Formerly known as Grantsdale and Calderwood, the chipsets support PCI Express and a number of other technologies designed to boost performance. While the “excursion” may be an embarrassment for Intel, it insists it has been able to catch the flaw early on and that almost no affected chipsets could have made it through to end users. As the products affected were shipped early they have been mostly contained within PC and motherboard makers, Intel believes. All product shipping now is unaffected, it claims. “We are checking 915 and 925 chipsets that were shipped prior to, and as of, the day of launch,” said Al-Schamma. “We have asked for affected shipments of this product to be returned to Intel for inspection or replacement, including for our Middle East customers. We believe almost none (a few thousand) of the impacted product has reached the end user.”

Add a Comment

Your display name This field is mandatory

Your e-mail address This field is mandatory (Your e-mail address won't be published)

Security code