Symbian Vs Microsoft

As mobile phones and PDAs (personal digital assistants) converge in terms of functionality and features, regional customers will benefit from the Microsoft and Symbian battle to control the mobile operating system says Bashar Dahabra, CEO, Info2cell.com.

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By  Maddy Reddy Published  February 17, 2004

As mobile phones and PDAs (personal digital assistants) converge in terms of functionality and features, regional customers benefit from the battle between Microsoft and Symbian to control the mobile operating system says Bashar Dahabra, CEO, Info2cell.com. The fight for the consumer's attention mainly involves two players: Microsoft on one hand, and Symbian, a company that is backed by phone manufacturers like Nokia, Sony-Ericsson and Siemens, on the other. Both are locked in a fierce battle over opposed operating systems. “We are watching the scene very intently, as our Wireless Application Service Provider (WASP) platform supports both Microsoft and Symbian operating systems,” says Bashar Dahabra, CEO, Info2cell.com. According to Dubai-based Madar Research Group, by the end of 2003, there were more than 30 million mobile phone subscribers in the Arab World with yearly growth rates of 52%. This number is expected double in size over the next six years, by 2010 providing the industry with the highest subscriber growth rates worldwide proving to be a huge market opportunity for mobile content and service providers. To provide region specific Arabic content, Info2cell works with AFP, WAM, Petra, MENA as well as 3 local TV stations. “The confrontation between Symbian and Microsoft has major significance for the Middle East because mobile phone users in the region are getting increasingly demanding when it comes to technology in mobile phones,” says Bashar Dahabra, CEO, Info2cell.com. “The intense rivalry is bound to result in improved products for the end-user at lower costs besides result in cutting-edge technology going into mobile phones”. The launch of i-mate, the smart new mobile pocket PC, which offers MMS, a built-in camera and Arabic language functionality is a good example of the combination between GSM and GPRS (General Packet Radio Services) says Dahabra. He adds that the i-mate will appeal mainly to a niche market in the professional user segment, but will not have any major impact on the mass market represented by the average user segments or casual mobile user segments. “The average user and casual user segments represent over 80% cent of mobile users. This gives Symbian a strong competitive edge, because mobile phone users over the past five years have got accustomed to the mobile interfaces of Nokia, Siemens and Sony Ericsson,” adds Dahabra.

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