BBC improves service with new installations

BBC Broadcast has plans to install seven Eyeheight playout master control systems at its new headquarters in London. The contract includes dual downstream keyers, audio lead/lag and automation command stacking. .

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By  Vijaya Cherian Published  January 27, 2004

BBC Broadcast has plans to install seven Eyeheight playout master control systems at its new headquarters in London. The contract includes dual downstream keyers, audio lead/lag and automation command stacking. Eyeheight will also supply the SD-2 subtitle decoder, AF-2 video index decoder and PM-2E in-vision audio level display, plus an AV-2E embedded-audio and video status monitor. This equipment will be used to control and monitor playout for both BBC Worldwide and its interactive channels. Systems integration will be undertaken by Television Systems Ltd. ”BBC Broadcast specifically stipulated embedded audio lead/lag and automation command stacking for this project to ensure frame-accurate control,” commented Eyeheight managing director Martin Moore. “The Eyeheight playout master control system satisfies both these key requirements. Developed from the presTX video and audio switching equipment family, playout enables broadcasters and systems integrators alike to configure a master control system to meet their exact current needs while retaining scalability for easy and efficient future expansion," he added. Playout comprises seven modules: base configuration unit, mix/wipe module, keyer, audio/voice-over module, internal cross-point, logo-store and dual-channel DVE. These can be combined to create a simple automated A/B mixer right up to a full-scale multi-channel master control system with manual over-ride. The base configuration unit comprises a 1U chassis capable of housing up to three independent channels and offering the lowest cost-per channel of any scalable master control system. BBC has also been in the news recently for deploying other new technologies as part of its efforts to improve its broadcast services. Recently, it signed an agreement with Pharos Communications to build a new automated scheduling system for the BBC World Service. The IP-based, Pharos-controlled system was meant to replace analogue routing equipment installed in 1982. The system enables a new NTP digital audio router to be accessed and operated via 96 existing control panels in various parts of the building. It also gives each of BBC World Service's 43 language sections the ability to control transmission output using a web browser.

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