MEAS touts for operations business beyond Beirut

Middle East Airport Services (MEAS), a division of Middle East Arilines, is marketing its services as an airport operator to civil aviation authorities across the region.

  • E-Mail
By  Neil Denslow Published  December 30, 2003

Middle East Airport Services (MEAS), a division of Middle East Arilines, is marketing its services as an airport operator to civil aviation authorities across the region. The company, which runs Beirut International, has already attracted interest from Sharjah and Fujairah, both of which have sent out formal request for proposal (RfPs). MEAS was established to handle operations at Beirut International when the airport opened in 1997. The company is now seeking to expand its business and, because of the limited number of opportunities available in Lebanon, it has set its sights on regional expansion. “The Lebanese market is very limited, as a matter of fact we only have one airport. So if we would like to be in the business of operating and maintaining airports, the obvious solution is to market our solutions outside of Lebanon as well,” explains Nabil Nassar, chairman & CEO of MEAS. MEAS has attracted serious interest from a number of airports, including Sharjah and Fujairah, which have both issued RfPs. Shrajah has already received a proposal and MEAS is now waiting for the response. The company is targeting airports in countries neighbouring Lebanon and the wider Gulf region. “The obvious targets [for us] are Jordan, Cyprus and the Emirates, and we are certainly trying to see if there are opportunities in Egypt and Kuwait,” says Nassar. “Anywhere nearby where we could make use of our experience and the Arabic language.” If successful, MEAS would take over the whole operational side of running an airport from cleaning the runways to maintaining the air conditioning. The policy side, such as slots management, and navigation would remain in the hands of the DCA. Outsourcing operations in this way would allow the airport to benefit from MEAS’s experience in Beirut, as well as from cost savings. The civil aviation authority would also benefit from having less staff to employ and manage, as MEAS would use its own managers and then hire the support staff itself. “We are trying to convince them [airports] that they are better off giving us the work, and getting rid off all the employees, so they do not have be burdened with 300-400 employees,” says Nassar. “If a DCA can outsource [operations] at a lower cost and, we hope, at a better level of service, then they will do that,” he predicts.

Add a Comment

Your display name This field is mandatory

Your e-mail address This field is mandatory (Your e-mail address won't be published)

Security code