Adobe cuts cost of its software

Adobe Systems is trying to combat piracy by making its software available to users in the Levant region at discounted rates. The User Partnership Initiative is aimed at Arabic-enabled versions of its software.

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By  Peter Branton Published  September 27, 2003

Adobe Systems is trying to combat piracy by making its software available to users in the Levant region at discounted rates. The User Partnership Initiative is aimed at Arabic-enabled versions of its software.

Customers in Lebanon, Egypt and Jordan will be able to buy legal copies of Arabic-enabled or fully localised Adobe products in boxed packages that will reflect what the customer actually wants to buy, the company said.

For instance, customers who do not wish to buy a manual with the CD will be able to do so. Users will also be able to buy multiple user-licences without having to buy a new CD and manual every time. The greater the actual number of users licenced the lower the final cost of software will be. Savings could amount to more than 50%, according to Adobe.

“As a leading software solutions developer, Adobe has always been a target of software pirates and has had a crucial stake in combating this menace,” said Ibrahim Lahoud, Middle East regional manager for Adobe Systems. “While one of the aspects of this war on piracy is the drive to educate users about the disadvantages of using illegal software the other crucial aspect has to be the need to address the cost-related concerns of the end user. It is usually such concerns that tempt people into using pirated software instead of the licensed versions.”

Over the years, Adobe has taken special note of the users’ desire for affordable quality Arabic software. While responding to this demand, the UPI will also help Adobe to consolidate its position as the leading provider of Arabic software to the creative professionals in the region. The affordability of licensed software will allow end-users to optimise the usability of Adobe’s products in everyday work-scenarios, since pirated software cannot compete with legal versions in terms of the variety of creative possibilities and the quality of the end-results offered by the software,” said John Boutros, general manager for GraphEast Computers LLC, the sole distributor of Adobe products in the Middle East.

At present, the User Partnership Initiative covers the existing range of Adobe products in the Middle East, including Photoshop, Acrobat and Design Collection.

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