DCS deploys wide range of products

Direct Computer Systems (DCS) is bringing its full range of hardware to hall 2. The local hardware player will showcase its Digital product line, which includes desktops, laptops, digital cameras, MP3 players, monitors and servers.

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By  Greg Wilson Published  September 29, 2003

Direct Computer Systems (DCS) is bringing its full range of hardware to hall 2. The local hardware player will showcase its Digital product line, which includes desktops, laptops, digital cameras, MP3 players, monitors and servers at this year's show.

"We're going to be showing a wide range of the latest and greatest hardware at the show," says Samer Bayrakdar, general manager, DCS.

"We're producing technically advanced machines at a competitive price," he adds.

The last three years has witnessed the prices on brand name PCs tumble, and the delivery of machines into the local market improve, in effect putting the squeeze on the locally assembled market.

To survive in the narrow margin PC game, local assemblers have had to evolve past the 'ma & pa' shops and into mature solution providers. "Customers are demanding quality," says Bayrakdar.

"Local assemblers have been getting vendor certification to prove the quality of their products. We use our relationships with Intel and Microsoft to distinguish ourselves," he adds.

The advent of HP's assembly planet in Saudi Arabia will up the competitive tempo in the local hardware market. HP hopes that the facility, which is due to commence operation at the end of the year, will be able to deliver low price machines to meet local demand.

"The main driver behind [the factory] is to come up with product configurations, which are specific to the market, and very competitive," explains Joseph Hanania, regional general manager, HP Middle East. "We are very confident this will enable us to compete from a price point angle very effectively with the non-brands," he predicts.

Despite HP's plans, DCS is confident that there remains a strong demand for locally assembled machines. According to Bayrakdar, assemblers will always be able to react quicker to market demand than their larger, more cumbersome rivals.

"If anything, HP's plans will impact the small local assemblers in the Saudi Arabian market. Those companies that don't focus on using quality components and haven't formed the correct partnerships with international vendors will go out of business," he explains.

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