Samsung plans connected home

Samsung Gulf Electronics is trumpeting a wide range of new wireless devices at today's Gitex and heralding the dawn of digital convergence and the 'connected' age.

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By  Kieran Potts Published  October 22, 2003

Samsung Gulf Electronics is trumpeting a wide range of new wireless devices at today's Gitex and heralding the dawn of digital convergence and the 'connected' age.

Amongst numerous new products and prototypes is the Samsung E-700 mobile phone with built-in camera.

Equipped with a night shot mode, it is able to take pictures in the dark and, furthermore, can take up to fifteen shots in rapid sequence within two seconds.

"The E-700 is a next-generation product that incorporates a flash for taking pictures under unfavourable light conditions and will open up a completely new experience for consumers and facilitate greater expression in peer-to-peer communication," says Mr Steve Han, senior manager, telecommunications, Samsung Gulf Electronics.

Also on display is the much anticipated Samsung PDA-phone, to be on sale by the first quarter of 2004 in the Middle East.

The MMS-enabled PDA phone boasts a built-in 330,000 pixel flash camera, 32MB RAM memory, JAVA capabilities, WAP 2.0 browser, 40-polyphonic ring tones, and a 65000-colour TFT-LCD screen.

The final model will be dual platform, sporting both PocketPC and Symbian operating systems.

Mr K S Vasudevan, senior manager, digital information technology division, Samsung Gulf Electronics, says these products are ready for the 'connected' age when digital products will be able to wirelessly interact with one another.

"There are two steps [to the connected age]," he explains.

"The first is creating innovation and bringing in convergent products, like monitors, DVD players and mobile phones. Then the second step is to turn these convergent products into a family of interrelated devices."

He says that the Samsung products on show at this year's Gitex are ready for the 'connected' age of MMS and 3G.

"It is important that a common platform is established from day one," he says, referring to the consortium of companies that is developing standard technology for wireless communication between devices.

"That is why DVD has taken a long time to emerge in a single format because companies have adapted the technology over time."

He concludes: "This technology is about making people more mobile. In the next few years, where you are will not matter. You won't have to go to the office to do you job. You won't have to go to a location to have a meeting... as it would be done via video conferencing through your mobile phone."

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