Paper sarnies going fast

Neusiedler has debuted a sandwich technology that blends different types of paper to create new varieties. Triotec sandwiches one type of paper between two layers of another to make the most of the contrasting properties of different types of paper.

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By  Simon Duddy Published  October 22, 2003

Neusiedler has debuted a sandwich technology that blends different types of paper to create new varieties. Triotec sandwiches one type of paper between two layers of another to make the most of the contrasting properties of different types of paper.

Christian Moussa, managing director of Neusiedler Middle East says, "Triotec paper has got three layers. It's a bit like a sandwich, where you have two types of one paper on the outside, with another type as the filling. This is useful to us. For example, very light paper often lacks strength and is also too transparent but if we use very light paper as the outside layers with a heavier layer in the middle, we can increase the strength and opacity of the page while keeping the paper reasonably light." Neusiedler has high hopes for the new paper and has so far made a $70 million investment in the technology.

The company is also using Gitex to promote its message that the paper is as important an ingredient as the printer in the output process. "You can have the right printers but it won't do you a lot of good if you don't have the correct paper too. It's a bit like buying a Ferrari and running it on low octane fuel. It will work, but you won't get the best experience," adds Christian.

Neusiedler works closely with printer manufacturers such as Panasonic, HP and Ricoh in a bid to assure a total printing experience for users.

Austria-based Neusiedler is one of Europe¦s leading manufacturers of office paper. The company manufactures a wide variety of office papers from prestige papers offering high whiteness, excellent opacity and good runnability to eco-friendly papers, which have won the Forest Stewardship Council Logo. To achieve this award, at least 30% of the paper must be derived from sustainably managed forests. 161

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