Intel gains acceptance in high end computing

Intel processors continue to make headway in the high-performance computing (HPC) sector, according to the latest edition of the Top 500 list of the world’s fastest supercomputers released this week.

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By  Patrick Phelvin Published  November 20, 2003

Intel processors continue to make headway in the high-performance computing (HPC) sector, according to the latest edition of the Top 500 list of the world’s fastest supercomputers released this week.

Nearly 38% of systems on the list use Intel processors, 15 percentage points more than the closest competing architecture and overtaking RISC-based systems for the first time.

The Top 500 project was started in 1993 to provide a reliable basis for tracking and detecting trends in high-performance computing. Twice a year, a list of the sites operating the 500 most powerful computer systems is assembled and released.

In other news, Intel Corporation at the Supercomputing 2003 Conference unveiled the Advanced Computing Programme, dedicating US$36 million and additional engineering resources to bolster R&D and investment in future HPC designs and solutions.

The list includes 189 systems based on Intel Itanium 2 or Intel Xeon processors, a 58% increase from just six months ago and more than triple the 56 systems listed in November 2002.

Five of the top 15 systems use Intel processors and the number of Intel Itanium 2-based systems increased to 32, up 68 percent from 19 systems in June.

“We are ecstatic about the acceptance of Intel’s standards-based approach to meet the needs of the most demanding applications in the world,” says Rod Oshea, Intel’s regional director in the Middle East, Turkey and Africa “Intel-based supercomputers are enabling breakthrough research to happen faster and more affordably for government, commercial and academic institutions in the Middle East and around the world. Our focus on this market segment and its future will benefit from our investment and work with key academia, government and industry advocates on the Advanced Computing Program effort,” he adds.

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