Clabby slams vendor's strategic position

The enterprise infrastructure strategies of several leading vendors operating in the Middle East have been slammed by Joe Clabby, president of US research analysis house Clabby Analytics.

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By  Paul Barthram Published  November 29, 2003

The enterprise infrastructure strategies of several leading vendors operating in the Middle East have been slammed by Joe Clabby, president of US research analysis house Clabby Analytics and key note speaker at November's Datamatix sponsored event the IT Vendors Conference.

"Vendors need to be measured by their ability to facilitate cross-platform communications, automate systems and streamline business processes," explains Clabby.

"Companies like HP are notoriously unprepared to deliver business process flow solutions. Where are the people to help with mass migration? Where are the people to help analyse and deploy new business process technologies and solutions? HP says it is an integrator of .Net and J2EE services, but this needs further proof," Clabby adds

HP are not the only vendor to fall foul of Cabby's critique, as both Dell and Oracle stand accused of not having adequate resources for advanced business process consulting, design and deployment.

The analyst also believes Sun Microsystems needs to improve its professional services and integration abilities if it is to survive.

"Sun's lack of foresight into the evolving server marketplace is very disturbing," says Clabby. "From my perspective, Sun's partners are well positioned to make money on professional services related to Sun's product lines in the future, whereas Sun itself is not."

The only vendor receiving something close to an endorsement is IBM, which Clabby applauds for its huge professional services organisation. According to the analyst, Big Blue is capable of helping enterprises design, implement and manage servers, as well as being able to offer integrated infrastructures on multiple operating environments.

However, it is not just the vendors that need to up their game to meet Clabby's exacting standards. The analyst argues that local end users also have work to do in terms of embracing systems that control the business process flow. Key to this endeavour is the adoption of web-based services, something the Middle East as a whole has been slow to do.

"IT specialists and businesses here [need] to understand how information systems architecture and infrastructure are being realigned to support business process flow," Clabby says.

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