PCs seized in UAE anti-piracy operation

A cache of 11 PCs loaded with pirated software has been seized by United Arab Emirates (UAE) officials in a joint operation between the Abu Dhabi authorities and the UAE’s Ministry of Information (MoI).

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By  Patrick Phelvin Published  December 14, 2003

A cache of 11 PCs loaded with pirated software has been seized by United Arab Emirates (UAE) officials in a joint operation between the Abu Dhabi authorities and the UAE’s Ministry of Information (MoI). The raid on an Abu Dhabi construction company yielded illegal versions of Windows Office, Autodesk and Norton Antivirus software.

The operation was part of a continued commitment by UAE authorities to fight the illegal use of software and protect the country’s developing IT industry. The UAE has reduced illegal software trading by adopting a series of campaigns against violators of copyright laws. These efforts have resulted in a decline in piracy rates in the UAE, from 86% in 1994 to 36% in 2002.

“This raid sends a direct message to end-users that strong action will be taken against violators of copyright laws. The company that we raided violated IPR laws by using illegal software. We have been urging traders and users to offer clear evidence that they are using original software in their systems. These efforts contribute in developing a healthy business environment that encourage foreign investments and foster creativity in software development and usage,” says Scott Butler, CEO of the Arabian Antipiracy Alliance (AAA).

The Business Software Alliance (BSA) and the MoI, in coordination with local and international IT companies, have been working jointly to eliminate the trade and usage of illegal software. BSA has recently undertaken a massive public service campaign targeting end-users, to raise awareness about the negative effects of using pirated software in their systems.

“The harmful effects of using illegal software are not restricted to users alone. Pirated software trade also affects regional and international software developing companies. As a result, Research and Development budgets in these companies are affected, which in turn affects pricing as well as restricts development of new, innovative software,” Butler adds.

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