Joy says he had fun but ends seasons at Sun

Sun Microsystem’s chief scientist Bill Joy is to leave the company he co-founded after more than 20 years to move on to “different challenges”. Joy has overseen some of Sun’s most important technology projects, including its development of Java, its Solaris operating system and its Sparc microprocessor architecture.

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By  Peter Branton Published  September 10, 2003

Sun Microsystem’s chief scientist Bill Joy is to leave the company he co-founded after more than 20 years to move on to “different challenges”. Joy has overseen some of Sun’s most important technology projects, including its development of Java, its Solaris operating system and its Sparc microprocessor architecture.

Joy co-founded the company originally called Stamford Univeristy Network with Scott McNealy in 1982, following his work on the Berkeley version of the Unix operating system. He also helped pioneer the concept of open source. More recently he has been working on Sun’s Jini technology, which is designed to help connect distributed systems.

“I am very proud of my accomplishments and the strong team we have built over the last two decades,” Joy said in a statement on his departure. “For 21 years, I’ve enjoyed the opportunities for innovation provided to me at Sun, but I have decided the time is now right for me to move on to different challenges.”

Joy’s responsibilities will be transferred to Greg Papadopoulos, Sun’s chief technology officer, the company said. “Bill will continue to be an inspiration to all innovators,” said Scott McNealy, Sun’s chairman. “We thank Bill for the strong legacy of innovation that he leaves in the hearts and souls of every Sun employee.”

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