Lovsan is lingering

Lovsan, Blaster, MSBlast, W32, call it what you will, last month’s worm is still out there and is infecting as many as 30,000 systems an hour according to security giant Network Associates. The company said it has received many reports of affected systems in the Middle East.

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By  Peter Branton Published  September 8, 2003

Lovsan, Blaster, MSBlast, W32, call it what you will, last month’s worm is still out there and is infecting as many as 30,000 systems an hour according to security giant Network Associates. The company said it has received many reports of affected systems in the Middle East.

Over 1.2 million systems worldwide are now believed to have been affected by Lovsan (as Network Associates terms it), which exploits a widely reported vulnerability in Windows to execute without requiring any action on the part of the user. It was intended to be used to trigger a mass denial-of-service attack on Microsoft’s web site on August 16, a plan which failed, but the worm is still widespread globally.

Using information collected on online information service HackerWatch.org, Network Associates can track how successful its McAfee Personal Firewall Plus product has been in blocking the worm.

“With HackerWatch.org, we are able to see, in real-time, the rapid spread of the Lovsan worm on a global scale,” said Patrick Hayati, regional director for Network Associates Middle East. “There has been a significant rise in activity as a result of the Lovsan worm, with over a million infected unique source IP addresses, highlighting the need for PC users to make sure they have comprehensive and constantly updated anti-virus and personal firewall solutions on their machines to prevent future attacks from these types of internet threats.”

Hayati said Middle East businesses need to be more aware of such threats. “Some businesses in the Middle East that have only recently converted to advanced IT-based systems have relatively low awareness on security issues, making them a prime target for intrusion, malicious threats, spam or hacking,” he said.

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