Microsoft looks at auto security

Microsoft is considering making software updates automatic for its Windows operating system. Executives say the move will see its auto-update feature become a default setting.

  • E-Mail
By  Peter Branton Published  September 3, 2003

Microsoft is considering making software updates automatic for its Windows operating system. Executives say the move will see its auto-update feature become a default setting.

Zaid Abunuwar, enterprise group director for Microsoft Gulf, said the idea is currently under consideration. “Personally speaking, I think it is a good idea to make critical updates as automatic as possible,” he said. “However, automatic updating is something that is still very much under discussion within the company right now.”

The reasoning behind such a feature is simple: despite repeated attempts Microsoft has not been able to get enough home users to download its security patches as it posts them. “We’ve done a very good job on the technical side in fixing problems, what we’re not doing so well is the education side,’ said Abunuwar.

Last month’s Blaster worm exploited a vulnerability Microsoft flagged up in July, but many users failed to update their systems in time. Microsoft issued a warning about the flaw and provided a patch for it in July, but many users had failed to apply it a month later.

Microsoft is also not the only company to go down the automatic update path. Symantec is using product activation in its latest edition of Norton AntiVirus, 2004, which automatically downloads and installs updates whenever the user is online.

Add a Comment

Your display name This field is mandatory

Your e-mail address This field is mandatory (Your e-mail address won't be published)

Security code