Epson launches new Durabrite

Epson has launched its second generation of Durabrite ink technology which includes water and fade resistance to plain, recycled and glossy photo paper.

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By  Vijaya Cherian Published  August 31, 2003

Epson has launched its second generation of Durabrite ink technology which includes water and fade resistance on a variety of media such as plain, recycled and glossy photo paper. Although the technology was initially designed to achieve rich colour expression, sharp text and image quality on plain paper, the growing demand for photo printing has led to Epson making the solution durable on glossy media as well. “Durabrite provides the consumer with the option to print documents, graphics or corporate images on plain or glossy paper, in a superior, professional finish, never seen before in a consumer inkjet printer,” says Khalil El-Dalu, general manager, Epson Middle East.

Epson claims that it is the only manufacturer in the consumer inkjet market to offer black and colour pigment. “Durabrite uses a unique formulation of these pigment-based inks, in a patented technology where each colour and black pigment ink particle is encapsulated in a resin. Unlike conventional inks, Durabrite ink's pigment particles attach to the surface of the paper and are not absorbed into the fibres. As a result, the ink does not spread out and adjacent dots do not bleed into one another, keeping colour near the surface and reducing ink and paper waste. The ink also dries as it leaves the printer (0.01 seconds as opposed to 10 seconds which is the general norm), so it is much less likely to smudge,” explains El-Dalu.

The solution is also highly water resistant even on plain paper, as the ink comprises insoluble particles. In comparison, conventional ink consists of colour-forming molecules that are absorbed into the paper or captured in the coating of resin-coated papers, much like watercolour paint. Durabrite also offers high light resistance of up to 80 years on speciality matte papers and up to 50 years on plain paper.

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