Local users turn to storage software

The use of storage management software is growing throughout the Middle East, as 36% of respondents to a recent itp.net survey said that they were actively using such solutions.

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By  Matthew Southwell Published  July 17, 2003

The use of storage management software is growing throughout the Middle East, as 36% of respondents to a recent itp.net survey said that they were actively using such solutions.

The need to manage storage infrastructures is paramount for a number of reasons, but foremost among these is the sheer volume of data local users are generating. For instance, last year’s ACN storage survey revealed that 68% of local companies expected their data to double during 2003 while a further 5% of participants predicted that it would more than triple.

“The amount of information customers are generating is growing. Customers used to come to us and ask for a storage area network (SAN) with a storage capacity of between 200 and 300 G/bytes. Today, they are coming to us and asking for a minimum of a Terabyte,” says Naji Robehmed, marketing manager for network storage solutions at HP.

A myriad of factors are contributing to this data growth, including modern business practices, legal requirements and a desire to hold information for future usage. Users are also trapped in a vicious data circle whereby they retain an increased amount of data so that they can use it to create yet more in the future.

“People are now keeping everything because they don’t know when they will need it. At the same time, the region’s businesses are doing well and more business means more information that needs storing,” comments Robehmed.

The generation of more data has, inevitably, led to an increased investment in storage solutions. “In the last couple of years, most companies in the Middle East have been installing SANs. However, they will have heterogeneous environments containing [different] products from a number of storage vendors. This means that the customer environment has become more fruitful, but also more complex,” says Andrew Mason, storage architect at Sun Microsystems Middle East & North Africa.

It is the management of this complexity and additional data that storage management software aims to address. For instance, Mike Hynes, regional manager for Veritas Middle East, argues that it is essential for ensuring businesses get the information they require when they want it.

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