BenQ wants eyes trained on it

BenQ is hoping to leverage its power in LCD manufacturing to capture a bigger chunk of the fast-growing LCD TV market in the Middle East. The vendor has used the greater purchasing muscle and expertise it has from being the second largest manufacturer of LCD panels in the world to source the best components for its latest LCD TV, the Q150.

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By  Peter Branton Published  June 18, 2003

BenQ is hoping to leverage its power in LCD manufacturing to capture a bigger chunk of the fast-growing LCD TV market in the Middle East. The vendor has used the greater purchasing muscle and expertise it has from being the second largest manufacturer of LCD panels in the world to source the best components for its latest LCD TV, the Q150.

“BenQ has a major business advantage in the LCD television market because we own the AU Panel factory, the second largest manufacturer of LCD panels in the world,” said Robert Dung, managing director, BenQ Middle East. “This has enabled us to source the highest quality panels for the production of the Q150 and to analyse what consumers want in the LCD market.”

What BenQ thinks customers want in the market is a LCD TV that can also be used as a computer monitor, HDTV capacity, noise reduction, built-in subwoofer and XGA resolution. Or at least, that’s some of the specs for the Q150, which also features an optional wireless kit, allowing users to move it from room to room.

“The new BenQ has tremendous crossover potential as both a tool for the office and an entertainment centre for the home,” said Manish Bakshi, director and chief of operations, BenQ Middle East. “We have customers around the world who use the Q150 in their home office, living room and even take it in the kitchen with them.”

BenQ is hoping the expansion of the LCD TV market in the region will match the performance of the LCD monitor market, which it describes as having seen “exponential” growth in the Middle East this year.

To justify that growth the vendor has included some research about television-watching habits in the region into its business case. It claims that the average person in the Middle East watches almost four hours of TV a day, suggesting the average adult will have spent nine years in front of the box by the time they reach 65.

“Given the amount of time we spend with our televisions, it is not surprising that people want the highest quality and most innovative technology,” said Bakshi.

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