AMD plans local office opening to boost Opteron sales

Although a suitable location has yet to be found or a timeline established, AMD is set to open a local office to help drive adoption of its 64-bit processor, Opteron, in the Middle East.

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By  Matthew Southwell Published  May 7, 2003

AMD is set to open a local office to help drive adoption of its 64-bit processor, Opteron, in the Middle East. Although a suitable location has yet to be found or a timeline established, the vendor believes its direct presence in the market will give users the necessary confidence to invest in its solutions and begin migrating to a 64-bit platform.

“To help the local market we have decided to open a local office. We have a sponsor and the papers and we are now looking for the location. The office will have enough tools to help people complete the transition [from 32-bit to 64-bit]… and we will also be able to educate the market,” says Pierre Brunswick, regional sales manager for Eastern Europe, Middle East & Africa at AMD.

In addition to establishing a Middle East office, the chip manufacturer will be sending seed systems to partners through its local distributor, Sky Electronics, to enable VARs and resellers to get ‘hands on’ with Opteron and better understand how it works. Furthermore, AMD will carry out a series of road shows and site visits to demonstrate the performance of Opteron to end users.

“On the hardware side, we have already taught our resellers how to convert all of their 32-bit systems and are ensuring that the main partners have been trained by AMD to provide support [for Opteron,]” says Manoj Thacker, managing director of Sky Electronics.

“Once this is done, we will go [to the market] segment by segment and explain the cost and performance benefits of Opteron. Initially, we will target those [sectors] that are not 100% mature and do not have a complete solution yet, such as the government sector,” he continues.

AMD is confident that it can persuade the region’s users to opt for Opteron over either RISC processors or Intel’s Itanium family. As such, it has set itself aggressive targets in terms of market share.

“Previously we thought we could achieve 25% market share in the Middle East, but now we are looking for 30%. However, as we are the only player in the 64-bit Windows market we should be targeting 100% market share [for Opteron],” says Brunswick.

While unable to predict how long it would take to achieve such a large market share, it is clear that it will take AMD some time, especially as the chip manufacturer still considers Opteron to be in its launch phase.

“We are still in the first phase of the roll out and this will remain the case until August. The first phase is all about selling a lot of hardware and after that we will see more and more applications coming,” explains Brunswick.

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