Toshiba goes wireless

Toshiba today joined the growing band of manufacturers to adopt the full range of Intel’s new Centrino technology with the launch of its new wireless notebook series.

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By  Andrew Picken Published  April 28, 2003

Toshiba today joined the growing band of manufacturers to adopt the full range of Intel’s new Centrino technology with the launch of its new wireless notebook series.

The four new series, Portégé R100, Tecra S1, Tecra M1 and Satellite Pro M10 will include the three elements of Centrino, the Intel Pentium M processor, core-logic architecture and PRO/Wireless network connection. This represents a further step towards ‘mobility only’ for Toshiba, which stopped manufacturing desktop PCs in September last year.

“As a leader in mobile computing, Toshiba has moved quickly to incorporate Intel’s Centrino mobile technology across the entire business notebook range” said Willem Poterman, general manager EMEA, at Toshiba’s computer marketing division.

By the end of 2004, Intel estimates that 90% of all new notebooks on the market will have wireless capabilities in them. A figure that Ahmed Khalil, regional manager of Toshiba computer systems in the Middle East, said justifies Toshiba strong focus on providing for digital convergence. He added: “following the phenomenal growth last year and a strong start in 2003, we have set a target for ourselves, to be number one vendor for portable computers in the Middle East by the end of the year.”

A key advantage of the new Centrino wireless technology is the use of public hot spots that allow you to make a wireless connection to the internet. The Middle East is currently severely lacking hotspots, Dubai having just one, but this is being addressed according to Ferruh Gurtas, business development manager for Intel Middle East.

He predicted that hundreds of hotspots will be in place throughout the Middle East by the end of the year and also praised Etisalat and other telco providers for their continued support and enthusiasm. Toshiba intends to play a key role in the proliferation of hot spots across the world, undertaking an operator role where it intends to collect payment for the use of its hot spots.

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