Disaster looms in the event of disaster

Despite the growing global tension, many firms are not prepared enough to withstand business and IT outages caused by a severe calamity, according to Gartner Dataquest.

  • E-Mail
By  Neil Denslow Published  March 6, 2003

Despite the growing global tension, many firms are not prepared enough to withstand business and IT outages caused by a severe calamity, according to Gartner Dataquest. It found that one in three businesses would lose critical data or operational capability if a disaster occurred, and therefore advocates immediate investment in disaster preparedness planning.

"More prioritised investments must be made to ensure that businesses can quickly regain productivity after a calamity," says Tony Adams, principal analyst for Gartner Dataquest's IT Services group. "Preparation is key, and without adequate investment for protection of critical systems, the repercussions of disasters will be lengthier and more costly," he adds.

The main reason for this low state of readiness cited in the Dataquest survey was a lack of funds. 24% of respondents said this was why they had not yet initiated a formal disaster plan.

"IT managers are not investing appropriately in disaster plans because they do not have a budget to accomplish their needed readiness," says Adams. "Budget constraints are forcing an average of 40% of respondents to rely on a 'best guess' to determine potential risk rather than obtaining formal assessments, which would be too costly."

A lack of financial support is also jeopardising companies that have got a plan in place. 37% of IT managers who have an organisational disaster plan in place told Dataquest that they needed additional investment to get their plans to a satisfactory level.

"The good news is that businesses now more widely understand that they must prepare in advance to solve the complex logistical and personnel problems inherent in a disaster," notes Adams. "Responsible leaders will rely on preparatory investment to better the odds of surviving such a hit to their business."

Add a Comment

Your display name This field is mandatory

Your e-mail address This field is mandatory (Your e-mail address won't be published)

Security code