Nice data for database vendors

The database market will surpass US$10 billion by 2003, says Aberdeen Group. It adds that significant shifts in IT buying and database technology will continue to change the range of choices for buyers.

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By  Neil Denslow Published  October 27, 2002

The database market will surpass US$10 billion by 2003 due to new applications, says Aberdeen Group. It adds that significant shifts in IT buying and database technology will continue to change the range of choices for buyers across all sectors of the market.

Aberdeen says that the success of specialised databases and of Microsoft’s SQL server database in supporting high end applications widens the choices available to IT buyers at both the low and high ends of the spectrum.

Furthermore, enterprise information integration (EII) is expected to play a significant role in the database market. EII provides a one-to-many database "veneer" on existing legacy data sources. This allows for potential business benefits from cross-database applications in administrative cost savings, programmer productivity and leveraging of competitive advantage information to deliver new ties to customers and suppliers. Increasingly, databases will have Web services front ends with similar effects.

"A strong focus on costs, combined with a realisation that in most cases it is impossible to combine and standardise databases has led buyers to undertake a more careful assessment of database purchases," says Wayne T. Kernochan, managing vice president, databases, development environments & software infrastructure.

"The rewards of successful assessment can be orders of magnitude improvements in database administrative costs — often the dominating costs of an application —performance and programmer productivity," he adds.

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