Business Software Alliance turns out in full force to interact with consumers

The Business Software Alliance (BSA) is going to be patrolling the thoroughfares of Computer Shopper once again this year. The software piracy watchdog is going to be interacting with customers during shopper’s six days and educating them on the value of legal software.

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By  Greg Wilson Published  October 6, 2002

The Business Software Alliance (BSA) is going to be patrolling the thoroughfares of Computer Shopper once again this year. The software piracy watchdog is going to be interacting with customers during shopper’s six days and educating them on the value of legal software.

“The Computer Shopper exhibition is mainly consumer focused and a great opportunity for the BSA to interact directly with resellers and end users and increase their awareness on intellectual property issues and the benefits of supporting legal software,” says Jawad Al Redha, regional director, BSA.

“In addition, the BSA will be able to address their questions about purchasing legal software and how to go about legalising their own software on a one-to-one basis,” he adds.

Creating an environment where intellectual property rights are protected is vital if the region’s fledgling IT economy is to take off. The strict implementation of the copyright protection laws in the UAE is a source of trust for regional and international developers, claims Al Redha.

The BSA has been working with government authorities across the region to increase awareness on the importance of defending intellectual property and the long term impact it has the local economy. “Our aim is to emphasise the negative impact of copying software without the consent of the owner or the creator, on the future of the economy and the society as a whole,” explains Al Redha.

The Middle East’s fight against software piracy has achieved some success. According to the Seventh Annual BSA Global Software Piracy Study, the Middle East bucked the global trend of increasing software piracy and registered the highest decrease in software piracy — a 6% decrease to reach 51% in 2001.

At this year’s Gitex the BSA is looking to educate visitors to the perils of online fraud. Pirated copies of commercial software given away on the web cost software companies millions of dollars each year.

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