End users lose say over control of web

A major shake up of the body that runs the Internet has seen rank and file web users lose their say. However, the new board of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers will include past critics.

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By  Neil Denslow Published  July 1, 2002

A major shake up of the body that runs the Internet has seen rank and file web users lose their say. However, the new board of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (Icann) will include past critics.

Stuart Lynn, the Icann president, had issued a reform document in February calling for radical changes. He wanted to increase the involvement of governments and end the Icann at-large membership, which was drawn from, and elected by, ordinary end users.

At a meeting in Bucharest, Romania, Icann voted unanimously to accept a plan that implemented these proposals. This will lead to greater representation from registries in charge of national domain names such as “.ae” or “.eg”. These bodies have often heavily criticised Icann's decisions.

Icann was founded in 1998 to oversee the transfer of control of the web from the US government to a wider body of web users. The BBC suggests that the reforms have been implemented in order to fend off calls from some US politicians for this process to be reversed.

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