Top 10 most bizarre laptop deaths

Dropping a laptop into a river has been voted the most bizarre way of destroying a computer by UK insurance firm, Complete Computer Cover. Second place was awarded to the mother who dropped an iron on her child’s laptop screen.

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By  Neil Denslow Published  June 16, 2002

Dropping a laptop into a river has been voted the most bizarre way of destroying a computer by UK insurance firm, Complete Computer Cover. Second place was awarded to the mother who dropped an iron on her child’s laptop screen.

The winner, a Yorkshire university student, dropped his laptop 20ft off a bridge after being pushed by his friend for a joke. The student provided full diagrams with his claim showing the bridge and the push.

Third spot went to a claimant whose dog had chewed through their laptop cable causing the machine to short out. The dog escaped unharmed. In fourth place was a woman who put her laptop down on her drive and then accidentally reversed her car over it. Fifth was a hospital worker who spilled a milkshake over their keyboard.

The other members of the top ten included someone who left their laptop on the roof of their car and then drove off in sixth place. Next was someone who dropped theirs down the stairs, while eighth place went to a laptop went fell victim to water damage in a hotel in Zambia. Ninth was someone who dropped a book on their keyboard and tenth was a laptop that fell out of a van.

David Milner, managing director of Complete Computer Cover, says “we thought analysing our claims data to find the most bizarre ways of ruining a portable would be an effective way of getting the insurance message across to computer users everywhere.

“Specific insurance for laptops is a sensible option for businesses and individuals. Most businesses will have too great an excess to make it worthwhile claiming on their policies, if indeed a claim is even appropriate as most laptops will not be covered when they are taken off the business premises. Similarly, many personal laptop owners may well have listed their device on their contents insurance, but little do they know that once they use it for business, they are not covered,” he adds.

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