Colour or bust, says Samsung

Samsung believes mobile phones will ship with colour LCD displays as standard in 2002. Demand has reached 60% market share in Japan, and is rising in this region. Enter the SGH-T100.

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By  Justin Etheridge Published  May 5, 2002

Manufacturers pushing sales of aging mobile phones in the Middle East have had a final wake-up call: Samsung has released its “future-retro” SGH-T100 phone in this region, complete with colour LCD display.

The 4096 TFT colour LCD screen is set to deliver superior visual effects, making graphics, games and screen savers a very real possibility. The phone’s new sound chip also boasts 16 polyphonic ring tones. Instead of a single monotonous tone, the mobile phone offers a veritable symphony of musical instruments.

Mr. B. W. Lee, vice president, Samsung Electronics MEAHQ, believes that the SGH-T100 will raise consumer expectations: “The SGH-T100 is an extremely strategic product for Samsung and has been designed in line with our vision of digital convergence.”

“Also, in keeping with the global mobile phone industry’s move towards providing advanced multimedia capabilities, the new phone combines superior images with high quality effects that will revolutionise the way consumers use mobile phones,” he added.

Mr. I. C. Chung, vice president of Mobile Communications, Samsung, and based in South Korea, believes that the global industry will soon adopt colour LCD as a universal standard. “The demand for mobile phones equipped with colour LCD is growing exponentially,” he said.

“In fact, in some markets such as Japan the market share of colour LCD phones stands at over 60%. Given the demanding consumer environment in the region, we expect the colour experience to become a mainstream market trend in 2002.”

The SGH-T100 will be pitched at Middle East users on the strength of its “future retro” look. Encased in a silver metallic casing with dual-screen folder design, the phone also features an enlarged keypad and the ability to download customised screen savers, much like a PC.

Five hundred phone book entries plus WAP and voice controls round out Samsung’s hottest handheld yet.

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