Broadcast product sales slump in 2001

New report shows worldwide decline in virtually all sectors of the video, film, and broadcast markets throughout 2001 but remains optimistic for 2002.

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By  Marcus Webb Published  April 15, 2002

2001 saw worldwide sales decline in nearly all categories of products for the video, film, and broadcast markets, according to a new series of reports being issued by market research firm SCRI International. While final figures from the reports, entitled "2001-2002 Broadcast/Pro Video Product Reports", are still being tabulated, the initial figures indicate sales dropped in 2001 from a peak in 2000 in a wide variety of product categories including, nonlinear editing systems, graphics and special effects, cameras, switchers, video monitors, storage, and lighting.

"The good news," however, says SCRI research director Des Chaskelson, "is that reported plans to buy in 2002 are strong, and we expect to see a rebound in 2002."

The reports cover 27 different categories of video and broadcast production equipment. Data for the report was collected via online surveys of more than 1000 US broadcast and pro video facilities working in the following vertical markets: television stations (broadcast and cable), post production facilities (video and film), video production and multimedia facilities, corporate and institutional video facilities (government, educational, medical).
For each product category, the reports show data for overall sales in 2001, plans to buy in 2002 in units and dollars, and brand shares and breakouts by type.

"One of the key trends we are seeing in both NLEs and graphics workstations," says Chaskelson, "is the move to lower priced, Windows/Mac based systems."

In the NLE product category, products priced under US$10,000 accounted for 58% of all NLE sales, while only 26% of the sales came for products priced over US$30,000. In the graphics and effects software category, products priced under US$5,000 accounted for 77% of all sales, while only 11% of the sales came from products priced over US$10,000.

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