IDC predicts near static IT budgets in 2002

Analyst house, IDC has published results from its latest survey of business attitudes to IT spending in Europe during 2002. The results present a mixed bag with regard to the deployment of new technologies.

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By  Guy Mathew Published  April 14, 2002

Analyst house, IDC has published results from its latest survey of business attitudes to IT spending in Europe during 2002. The results present a very mixed bag with regard to the deployment of new technologies and willingness to spend.

Among the more surprising results is the finding that only six per cent of IT managers see wireless networking as an important technology. That compares with 32% of the sample that rated PC renewal as ‘important’ or ‘very important’.

Amidst the talk of wireless networks emerging as a key technology, the fact that 94% of businesses polled did not consider it important is not good news for network vendors.

The trend towards desktop replacement notebooks did not get the backing some observers might have expected either. Of companies planning to buy notebooks in 2002, 35% said they would be desktop replacements while handheld devices like PDAs were not seen as a substitute for notebooks. The survey also showed that on most purchasing decisions like this price itself was still the main influencing factor as opposed to total cost of ownership (TCO).

Server consolidation was another feature of the results with some 42% having already consolidated or were planning to. IT managers did not expect the appliance server market to take off in the near future as 44% had not even heard of them but of those that had opted to use them, 61% used them to replace general purpose servers.

Commenting on these results Chris Ingle, group consultant for IDC’s EMEA systems group, said: “This is a very interesting set of results. We continue to see caution among large businesses, delaying their deployment of relatively new technologies such as wireless networks. However, businesses of all sizes are still willing to spend on infrastructure rationalisation — for example, server consolidation — and on well costed projects such as PC renewal.”

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