Veritas extends disaster recovery seminars

Storage software specialist Veritas has announced its disaster recovery roadshow is to be extended after it attracted 16,000 visitors worldwide over the past five months.

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By  Guy Mathew Published  April 1, 2002

Storage software specialist Veritas has announced its disaster recovery roadshow is to be extended after it attracted 16,000 visitors worldwide over the past five months. Disaster recovery is a hot topic at the moment as the company’s own figures show that most businesses are not properly prepared and the uncertainty created by September 11 has focused minds on the issue.

Veritas has been running the seminars since November last year and says that the delegates come from all areas of business. Veritas’ own research suggests that for 55% of companies downtime of anything more than one hour is sufficient to have a negative impact on the business.

“Studies show that 60% of all businesses today have no disaster recovery plan and 85% have no business continuity plan in place, which explains why our disaster recovery seminars have been so successful,” said Greg Valdez, vice president and chief information officer, Veritas Software. “Veritas Software has redefined disaster recovery technology by introducing storage software solutions that can make data, Web sites, business applications and transactions recoverable almost instantaneously at an alternate site.”

At the same time the company has announced that it has appointed Dr Chris Boorman as vice president for marketing in the EMEA region. As part of its growth strategy Veritas wants to coordinate operations in EMEA more closly with its home market in the US.

At present it has 30% of the independent storage software market, according to analyst firm, Gartner Dataquest. That figure excludes proprietary software that runs on specific hardware but the reoprt states that Veritas’ licence sales grew fourteen per cent in 2001 compared to the market which grew by only three per cent.

“While disk array growth stalled in 2001, software continued to deliver growth as companies looked to better use the storage hardware installed,” said Carolyn DiCenzo, vice president and research director, Gartner Dataquest.

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