ERP projects build business

French consulting company Atos Origin is looking forward to a busy year as it grows its presence in the Middle East. The company, which has over 27,000 employees worldwide and a turnover of $3 billion per year, has recently completed work on the Amman stock exchange, and will be rolling out a solution for the Beirut exchange in 2002.

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By  Mark Sutton Published  October 17, 2001

French consulting company Atos Origin is looking forward to a busy year as it grows its presence in the Middle East. The company, which has over 27,000 employees worldwide and a turnover of $3 billion per year, has recently completed work on the Amman stock exchange, and will be rolling out a solution for the Beirut exchange in 2002.

The solution was originally developed for the Paris bourse, and has since been rolled out for exchanges in Casablanca and Tunis, and on five continents. The company’s expertise is such that it has joined with the Paris, Amsterdam and Brussels bourses to form AtosEuronext, a leading player in financial market automation.
AtosEuronext will be handling the work on the Beirut Stock Exchange project, which will begin in 2002.

The company is not just about financial services technology however. Business development manager Ammar Kurdali explained that Atos offers a full range of IT services, from design and development to managed services, training and support. As a strategic partner for both SAP and Oracle, the company’s 400 Middle East staff have been involved in a range of projects, including ERP.

The company was responsible for Saudi Aramco’s SAP deployment. The project, which with 36,000 seats, is the largest implementation of the ERP solution in the region, took five years and cost half a billion dollars. Around 60% of Atos’ regional staff are involved with SAP projects—oil and gas companies have been among the first to deploy widescale ERP in the region, and Atos has also deployed SAP for Royal Dutch Shell in the Middle East, and is hoping for more opportunities in the region.

“Even if you forget business-to-business exchanges for the time being, there are lots of opportunities for projects with mid-to large companies in the region, to automate the back-end,” said Kurdali. “Before implementing ERP companies have to be ready, at the highest level, to change to doing business by best practices and functionality, but they are ready and capable.”

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